Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Book Club’ Category

August Book Group — Monday, August 12 — 2 pm — Palermo

The BAIN Book Group meets on the second Monday of each month.  This month we will meet in Palermo.  Please send your RSVP to tonilin@aol.com for the exact address.  Do not communicate directly with bain.downtown@gmail.com, please.  Bring suggestions for future books to the meeting or send suggestions to tonilin@aol.com.  Books for the remainder of 2019 are listed below.

At the August meeting we will be discussing Sea Stories, by William H. McRaven.

Books for the Remainder of 2019

August – Sea Stories, William H. McRaven, 353 pages.

Following the success of his #1 New York Times bestseller Make Your Bed, which has sold over one million copies, Admiral William H. McRaven is back with amazing stories of adventure during his career as a Navy SEAL and commander of America’s Special Operations Forces.  Sea Stories is an unforgettable look back on one man’s incredible life, from childhood days sneaking into high-security military sites to a day job of hunting terrorists and rescuing hostages.

“A book to inspire your children and grandchildren to become everything that they can. … Most of all, it is a book that will leave you with tears in your eyes.”

―Wall Street Journal

 

September – The Dutch Wife, Ellen Keith, 352 pages

From the Netherlands to Germany to Argentina, The Dutch Wife braids together the stories of three individuals who share a dark secret and are entangled in two of the most oppressive reigns of terror in modern history. This is a novel about the blurred lines between love and lust, abuse and resistance, and right and wrong, as well as the capacity for ordinary people to persevere and do the unthinkable in extraordinary circumstances.

 

October — Timbuktu – Paul Auster, 204 pages

Meet discerning and sympathetic Mr. Bones, a dog who is unconditionally faithful to his troubled master, Willy G. Christmas. Auster’s leading human character is once again a tormented writer from Brooklyn who blindly believes in his ideals and willingly chooses to become a vagabond. But the real hero is the four-legged creature who follows him on his impromptu journeys and leads readers through the story.

This is not the kind of work Auster has been praised for, but it proves his hunger for innovation once again. Timbuktu will undoubtedly provoke mixed responses, but that is the price of originality. There is something plain yet mysteriously intricate beneath Auster’s trademark smooth writing.
AMirela Roncevic, “Library Journal”
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 

November – Nothing to be Frightened Of – Julian Barnes, 258 pages

NATIONAL BESTSELLER,  A NEW YORK TIMES BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR

A memoir on mortality as only Julian Barnes can write it, one that touches on faith and science and family as well as a rich array of exemplary figures who over the centuries have confronted the same questions he now poses about the most basic fact of life: its inevitable extinction. If the fear of death is “the most rational thing in the world,” how does one contend with it? An atheist at twenty and an agnostic at sixty, Barnes looks into the various arguments for, against, and with God, and at his own bloodline, which has become, following his parents’ death, another realm of mystery.

Deadly serious, masterfully playful, and surprisingly hilarious, Nothing to Be Frightened Of is a riveting display of how this supremely gifted writer goes about his business and a highly personal tour of the human condition and what might follow the final diagnosis.

 

December – The Island of Sea Women – Lisa See, 384 pages

A new novel from Lisa See, the New York Times bestselling author of The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, about female friendship and family secrets on a small Korean island.

A book that will make you cringe, but eventually pull you in to a friendship that was special and the lives of these women of the sea. It is well written, well researched and the prose is wonderful. It is a novel that shows how much we miss, misjudge, when we fail to forgive.

 

 

July Book Group — Monday, July 8 — 2 pm — Palermo

The BAIN Book Group meets on the second Monday of each month.  This month we will meet in Palermo.  Please send your RSVP to tonilin@aol.com for the exact address.  Do not communicate directly with bain.downtown@gmail.com, please.  Bring suggestions for future books to the meeting or send suggestions to tonilin@aol.com.  Books for the remainder of 2019 are listed below.

At the July meeting we will be discussing Where the Crawdads Sing, by Delia Owens

The wildlife scientist Delia Owens has found her voice in WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING, a painfully beautiful first novel that is at once a murder mystery, a coming-of-age narrative and a celebration of nature. … Owens here surveys the desolate marshlands of the North Carolina coast through the eyes of an abandoned child. And in her isolation that child makes us open our own eyes to the secret wonders — and dangers — of her private world.    — New York Times

 

Books for the Remainder of 2019

August – Sea Stories, William H. McRaven, 353 pages.

Following the success of his #1 New York Times bestseller Make Your Bed, which has sold over one million copies, Admiral William H. McRaven is back with amazing stories of adventure during his career as a Navy SEAL and commander of America’s Special Operations Forces.  Sea Stories is an unforgettable look back on one man’s incredible life, from childhood days sneaking into high-security military sites to a day job of hunting terrorists and rescuing hostages.

“A book to inspire your children and grandchildren to become everything that they can. … Most of all, it is a book that will leave you with tears in your eyes.”

―Wall Street Journal

 

September – The Dutch Wife, Ellen Keith, 352 pages

From the Netherlands to Germany to Argentina, The Dutch Wife braids together the stories of three individuals who share a dark secret and are entangled in two of the most oppressive reigns of terror in modern history. This is a novel about the blurred lines between love and lust, abuse and resistance, and right and wrong, as well as the capacity for ordinary people to persevere and do the unthinkable in extraordinary circumstances.

 

October — Timbuktu – Paul Auster, 204 pages

Meet discerning and sympathetic Mr. Bones, a dog who is unconditionally faithful to his troubled master, Willy G. Christmas. Auster’s leading human character is once again a tormented writer from Brooklyn who blindly believes in his ideals and willingly chooses to become a vagabond. But the real hero is the four-legged creature who follows him on his impromptu journeys and leads readers through the story.

This is not the kind of work Auster has been praised for, but it proves his hunger for innovation once again. Timbuktu will undoubtedly provoke mixed responses, but that is the price of originality. There is something plain yet mysteriously intricate beneath Auster’s trademark smooth writing.
AMirela Roncevic, “Library Journal”
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 

November – Nothing to be Frightened Of – Julian Barnes, 258 pages

NATIONAL BESTSELLER,  A NEW YORK TIMES BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR

A memoir on mortality as only Julian Barnes can write it, one that touches on faith and science and family as well as a rich array of exemplary figures who over the centuries have confronted the same questions he now poses about the most basic fact of life: its inevitable extinction. If the fear of death is “the most rational thing in the world,” how does one contend with it? An atheist at twenty and an agnostic at sixty, Barnes looks into the various arguments for, against, and with God, and at his own bloodline, which has become, following his parents’ death, another realm of mystery.

Deadly serious, masterfully playful, and surprisingly hilarious, Nothing to Be Frightened Of is a riveting display of how this supremely gifted writer goes about his business and a highly personal tour of the human condition and what might follow the final diagnosis.

 

December – The Island of Sea Women – Lisa See, 384 pages

A new novel from Lisa See, the New York Times bestselling author of The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, about female friendship and family secrets on a small Korean island.

A book that will make you cringe, but eventually pull you in to a friendship that was special and the lives of these women of the sea. It is well written, well researched and the prose is wonderful. It is a novel that shows how much we miss, misjudge, when we fail to forgive.

 

 

June Book Group — Monday, June 10, 2 to 4 pm — Palermo

This month we will be reading a short but powerful book, Night, by Elie Wiesel.  Please RSVP to mfkp4@msn.com for the exact address.

Books for the remainder of 2019 will be discussed at this meeting.  Please send suggestions to tonilin@aol.com, or bring ideas to the meeting.

 

May Book Group — May 14 — 2 pm — in Caballito

The BAIN Book Group meets on the second Tuesday of each month.  This month we will meet in Caballito.  Please send your RSVP to tonilin@aol.com for the exact address.  Do not communicate directly with bain.downtown@gmail.com, please.  Bring suggestions for future books to the meeting or send suggestions to tonilin@aol.com.  Books to be read for the remainder of 2019 will be decided on at the May meeting.

At the May meeting we will be discussing Lab Girl, by Hope Jahren.

Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. Lab Girl is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments but also the exhilarating discoveries of scientific work. Central is a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the U.S.  and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.  Lab Girl opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal.

 

 

April Book Group — Tuesday, April 9, 2 pm in Recoleta

This month we will meet in Recoleta.  Please send your RSVP to jimvillage@yahoo.com for the exact address.

At the April meeting we will be discussing Gone So Long by Andre Dubus III. Dubus III’s first novel in a decade is a masterpiece of thrilling tension and heartrending empathy.Few writers can enter their characters so completely or evoke their lives as viscerally as Andre Dubus III. In this deeply compelling new novel, a father, estranged for the worst of reasons, is driven to seek out the daughter he has not seen in decades.Cathartic, affirming, and steeped in the empathy and precise observations of character for which Dubus is celebrated, Gone So Long explores how the wounds of the past afflict the people we become, and probes the limits of recovery and absolution.

The book we will read in May 2019 is described below.  If you have suggestions or comments, send them to tonilin@aol.com.

Please join us for the discussion.  Whether or not you have read the book you are welcome to participate.  We meet on the second Tuesday of each month.

May — Hope, Jahren. Lab GirlNew York: Vintage, 2017. 290 pp.

Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. Lab Girl is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments but also the exhilarating discoveries of scientific work. Central is a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the U.S.  and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.  Lab Girl opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal.

 

February Book Group — Tuesday, February 12 — 2 pm — Palermo

We will meet in Palermo, not in Caballito (as we had planned at the last meeting).

At the February meeting we will be discussing There There by Tommy Orange.

The books we will read from February through May 2019 are listed below.  If you have suggestions or comments, send them to tonilin@aol.com.

Please join us for the discussion.  Whether or not you have read the book you are welcome to participate.  We meet on the second Tuesday of each month.

RSVP to tonilin@aol.com.  You will receive the address in response.

February — Orange, Tommy.  There There.  2018.  304 pp.

Orange’s debut is an ambitious meditation on identity and its broken alternatives, on myth filtered through the lens of time and poverty and urban life. Its many short chapters are told through a loosely connected group of Native Americans living in Oakland, Calif., as they travel to a powwow. They are all, as in Chaucer, pilgrims on their way to a shrine, or, as in Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying,” an extended family crossing the landscape. The novel is their picaresque journey, allowing for moments of pure soaring beauty to hit against the most mundane, for a sense of timelessness to be placed right beside a clear eyed version of the here and now.

March — Roy, Arundhati, The God of Small Things. New York: Random House, 2008. 333 pp.

Compared favorably to the works of Faulkner and Dickens, Arundhati Roy’s modern classic is equal parts family saga, love story, and political drama. The seven-year-old twins Estha and Rahel see their world shaken irrevocably by the arrival of their beautiful young cousin, Sophie. It is an event that will lead to an illicit liaison and tragedies accidental and intentional, exposing “big things [that] lurk unsaid” in a country drifting dangerously toward unrest. Lush, lyrical, and unnerving, The God of Small Thingsis an award-winning landmark that started for its author an esteemed career of fiction and political commentary that continues unabated.

April — Boyne, John. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. Oxford, England: David Fickling Books, 2007. 215 pp.

Bruno is 9 years old. His father has a cool job, he’s in charge of a lot of stuff. He runs a big place, with a huge wire fence, and a lot of people—men and boys—on the other side. They are skinny, they work hard, they are all very dirty, they are all wearing what looks like striped pajamas. There are soldiers, who poke at and laugh at the men and boys. Bruno has overheard his parents talking, and knows that his father’s boss, “The Fury,” arranged for them to move to the new home. Bruno’s older sister tells him that the place is called Out With.Bruno is not allowed to approach the camp, or the fence. But, since he plans on becoming an explorer when he grows up, he decides to go exploring. And on the other side of the fence he sees a speck. A tiny thing that, as he gets closer, reveals itself to be a boy. Perhaps a boy for Bruno to play with. This book is startling, horrifying, and yet the story is told in a charming way. Bruno and his friendship with Shmuel through the fence is just the story of two boys, but also a story of a Jewish Concentration Camp, told through the unaware eyes of the son of the man in charge of the camp. Bruno’s naivete brings humanity into the story.

May — Hope, Jahren. Lab Girl. New York: Vintage, 2017. 290 pp.

Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. Lab Girl is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments but also the exhilarating discoveries of scientific work. Central is a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the U.S.  and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.  Lab Girl opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal.

January Book Club, changed to Thursday, January 10, 2 pm, Caballito

At the January meeting we will be discussing Give People Money by Annie Lowrey.

The books we will read from January through 2019 are listed below.  If you have suggestions or comments, send them to tonilin@aol.com.

Please join us for the discussion.  Whether or not you have read the book you are welcome to join in.  We meet on the second Tuesday of each month.

RSVP to tonilin@aol.com.  You will receive the address in response.

1  January — Lowery, Annie. Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World.New York: Crown, 2018. 272 pp.

A brilliantly reported, global look at universal basic income—a stipend given to every citizen—and why it might be necessary in an age of rising inequality, persistent poverty, and dazzling technology. Imagine if every month the government deposited $1,000 into your bank account, with no expectations. It sounds crazy. But it has become one of the most influential and debated policy ideas of our time. In this sparkling and provocative book, economics writer Annie Lowrey examines the UBI movement from many angles. She travels to Kenya to see how a UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth, India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor, South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree, and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human labor.

2  February — Orange, Tommy.  There There.  2018.  304 pp.

Orange’s debut is an ambitious meditation on identity and its broken alternatives, on myth filtered through the lens of time and poverty and urban life. Its many short chapters are told through a loosely connected group of Native Americans living in Oakland, Calif., as they travel to a powwow. They are all, as in Chaucer, pilgrims on their way to a shrine, or, as in Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying,” an extended family crossing the landscape. The novel is their picaresque journey, allowing for moments of pure soaring beauty to hit against the most mundane, for a sense of timelessness to be placed right beside a cleareyed version of the here and now.

3  March — Roy, Arundhati, The God of Small Things. New York: Random House, 2008. 333 pp.

Compared favorably to the works of Faulkner and Dickens, Arundhati Roy’s modern classic is equal parts family saga, love story, and political drama. The seven-year-old twins Estha and Rahel see their world shaken irrevocably by the arrival of their beautiful young cousin, Sophie. It is an event that will lead to an illicit liaison and tragedies accidental and intentional, exposing “big things [that] lurk unsaid” in a country drifting dangerously toward unrest. Lush, lyrical, and unnerving, The God of Small Thingsis an award-winning landmark that started for its author an esteemed career of fiction and political commentary that continues unabated.

4 April — Boyne, John. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. Oxford, England: David Fickling Books, 2007. 215 pp.

Bruno is 9 years old. His father has a cool job, he’s in charge of a lot of stuff. He runs a big place, with a huge wire fence, and a lot of people—men and boys—on the other side. They are skinny, they work hard, they are all very dirty, they are all wearing what looks like striped pajamas. There are soldiers, who poke at and laugh at the men and boys. Bruno has overheard his parents talking, and knows that his father’s boss, “The Fury,” arranged for them to move to the new home. Bruno’s older sister tells him that the place is called Out With.Bruno is not allowed to approach the camp, or the fence. But, since he plans on becoming an explorer when he grows up, he decides to go exploring. And on the other side of the fence he sees a speck. A tiny thing that, as he gets closer, reveals itself to be a boy. Perhaps a boy for Bruno to play with. This book is startling, horrifying, and yet the story is told in a charming way. Bruno and his friendship with Shmuel through the fence is just the story of two boys, but also a story of a Jewish Concentration Camp, told through the unaware eyes of the son of the man in charge of the camp. Bruno’s naivete brings humanity into the story.

5 May — Hope, Jahren. Lab Girl. New York: Vintage, 2017. 290 pp.

Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. Lab Girl is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments but also the exhilarating discoveries of scientific work. Central is a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the U.S.  and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.  Lab Girl opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal.

December Book Group — 3:30 pm in Caballito

RSVP to tonilin@aol.com.  You will receive the address in response.

At the December meeting we will be discussing A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles.

At the December meeting we will talk about books to be read in 2019.  If you have suggestions, send them to tonilin@aol.com as soon as possible.

Please join us for the discussion.  Whether or not you have read the book you are welcome to join in.  We meet on the second Tuesday of each month

November Book Group — November 13 at 2pm

RSVP to Paula:  paulafrederick3@gmail.com. You will receive the address in a reply email.

At the November meeting we will be discussing My Michael by Amos Oz. Our location for this meeting is to be announced.  Please send suggestions for books to be read in 2019 to Toni at tonilin@aol.com.

Please join us for the discussion, whether or not you have read the book.  You are welcome to join us.  We meet on the second Tuesday of the month at 2 pm.

The book to be read for December 2018 is Amor Towles — A Gentleman in Moscow —  December 11, 2018

October Book Group — Tuesday, October 9, 2 pm in Caballito

At the October meeting we will be discussing A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce. Our location for this meeting is in Caballito.  Address sent to you upon RSVP to tonilin@aol.com.  Please bring suggestions for books to be read in 2019.

Please join us for the discussion, whether or not you have read the book.  You are welcome to join us.  We meet on the second Tuesday of the month at 2 pm.

A list of the books to be read for the remainder of 2018 is below.

Amos Oz — My Michael — November 13, 2018
Amor Towles — A Gentleman in Moscow —  December 11, 2018

%d bloggers like this: